Sea Level in the Southwest Pacific is Stable

By | August 31, 2009

 

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[Illustrations, footnotes and references available in PDF version]

Graphs of sea level for twelve locations in the southwest Pacific show stable sea level for about ten years over the region.  The data are compared with results from elsewhere, all of which suggest that any rise of global sea level is negligible.  The Darwin theory of coral formation, and subsidence ideas for guyots would suggest that we should see more land subsidence, and apparent sea level rise, than is actually occurring. Sea level studies have not been carried out for very long, but they can indicate major tectonic components such as isostatic rebound in Scandinavia. Attempts to manipulate the data by modelling to show alarming rates of sea level rise (associated with alleged global warming) are not supported by primary regional or global data. Even those places frequently said to be in grave danger of drowning, such as the Maldives, Tuvalu and Holland, appear to be safe.