Medieval Warm Period in the Artic

By | August 28, 2013

 

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This review begins with the study of Dahl-Jensen et al. (1998)1, who used temperature measurements from two Greenland Ice Sheet boreholes to reconstruct the temperature history of this portion of the earth over the past 50,000 years. Their data indicated that after the termination of the glacial period, temperatures steadily rose to a maximum of 2.5°C warmer than at present during the Holocene Climatic Optimum (4,000 to 7,000 years ago). The Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and Little Ice Age (LIA) were also observed in the record, with temperatures 1°C warmer and 0.5-0.7°C cooler than at the time of their writing, respectively. After the Little Ice Age, they report that temperatures once again rose, but that they had “decreased during the last decades,” thereby indicating that the MWP in this part of the Arctic was significantly warmer than it was just before the turn of the century.