Onward Marches the Great Pause

By | December 23, 2014

Since October 1996 there has been no global warming at all (Fig. 1). This month’s RSS temperature plot pushes up the period without any global warming from 18 years 1 month to 18 years 2 months (indeed, very nearly 18 years 3 months). Will this devastating chart be displayed anywhere at the Lima conference? Don’t bet on it.

Response of Various Marine Animals to Ocean Acidification and Warming

By | December 6, 2014

Most of the ocean acidification research conducted to date has focused solely on the biological impacts of declining seawater pH. Few studies have investigated the interactive effects of ocean acidification and temperature. This summary examines what has been learned in several such studies of various marine organisms that challenge the alarming and negative projections of the IPCC on… Read More »

FACE Experiments and Grassland Species

By | December 6, 2014

In atmospheric CO2 enrichment experiments, nearly all plants almost always exhibit increases in photosynthetic rates and biomass production when environmental conditions are optimal for growth. Even when conditions are less than favorable (low soil moisture, poor soil fertility, high soil salinity, high air temperature), many plants still exhibit a CO2-induced growth enhancement; and that relative or percentage enhancement… Read More »

Effects of Ocean Acidification on Fish

By | December 6, 2014

As the air’s CO2 content rises in response to ever-increasing anthropogenic CO2 emissions, and as more and more carbon dioxide therefore dissolves in the surface waters of the world’s oceans, theoretical reasoning suggests the pH values of the planet’s oceanic waters should be gradually dropping. The IPCC and others postulate that this chain of events, commonly referred to… Read More »

Response of Fish to Ocean Warming

By | November 11, 2014

According to the IPCC, CO2-induced global warming will be net harmful to the world’s marine species. This summary examines this hypothesis for various fish species, presenting evidence in opposition to the IPCC’s point of view.

Additional Grounds for Rejecting Biofuels

By | October 31, 2014

In July of 1987, as described by U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers Idso and Kimball (2001)[1], eight 30-cm-tall sour orange tree (Citrus aurantium L.) seedlings were planted directly into the ground at the Agricultural Research Service’s U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory in Phoenix, Arizona, where they were enclosed in pairs within four clear-plastic-wall open-top chambers. Then, in November of… Read More »

The Global Medieval Warm Period

By | October 30, 2014

Between the 10th and 14th centuries AD, earth’s average global temperature may have been warmer than it is today, according to the analyses of Lamb (1977, 1984, 1988) and Grove (1988). The existence of this Medieval Warm Period was initially deduced from historical weather records and proxy climate data from England and Northern Europe. Interestingly, the warmer conditions… Read More »

Growth Rates of Old Versus Young Forest Trees

By | September 25, 2014

The planting and preservation of forests has long been acknowledged to be an effective and environmentally-friendly means for slowing climate-model-predicted CO2-induced global warming. This prescription for moderating potential climate change is based on two well-established and very straightforward facts: (1) the carbon trees use to construct their tissues comes from the air, and (2) its extraction from the… Read More »

Water Use Efficiency of Agricultural Species

By | September 24, 2014

In some cases, the water-use efficiency increases caused by atmospheric CO2 enrichment are spectacularly high. De Luis et al. (1999)[1], for example, demonstrated that alfalfa plants subjected to atmospheric CO2 concentrations of 700 ppm had water-use efficiencies that were 2.6 and 4.1 times greater than those displayed by control plants growing at 400 ppm CO2 under water-stressed and… Read More »

Tropical Trees

By | September 13, 2014

Going back in time to the final few years of the 20th century, Schaffer et al. (1997)[1] grew two mango ecotypes – one evolving from a warm, humid tropical climate, and the other from a cool, dry subtropical region – for 12 months in glasshouses maintained at either 350 or 700 ppm CO2 in order to determine the… Read More »