But What Do We Mean by Consensus?

By | September 18, 2013

The celebrated mathematician, astronomer and philosopher of science Abu Ali Ibn al-Haytham, or Alhazen, is justly celebrated as the founder of the scientific method. His image appears on Iraqi banknotes and on the postage stamps of half a dozen nations of the ummah wahida. Al-Haytham, unlike Naomi Oreskes, did not consider that consensus had any role in science.

Medieval Warm Period in South America

By | September 4, 2013

Was there a Medieval Warm Period anywhere in addition to the area surrounding the North Atlantic Ocean, where its occurrence is uncontested? This question is of utmost importance to the ongoing global warming debate, since if there was, and if the locations where it occurred were as warm then as they are currently, there is no need to… Read More »

Response to the Scare-Mongering of the Financial Times

By | September 4, 2013

A recent article in the Financial Times reproduced on the internet recently by CNBC (http://www.cnbc.com/id/100912062), is predicated on the assumption that there has been a “record decline in Arctic sea ice”. However, the data on sea-ice extent only go back to 1979. And they show the Arctic sea ice declining but Antarctic sea ice increasing, so that the… Read More »

Response to the Scare-Mongering of the Financial Times

By | September 4, 2013

A recent article in the Financial Times reproduced on the internet recently by CNBC (http://www.cnbc.com/id/100912062), is predicated on the assumption that there has been a “record decline in Arctic sea ice”. However, the data on sea-ice extent only go back to 1979. And they show the Arctic sea ice declining but Antarctic sea ice increasing, so that the… Read More »

The Future of Biospheric Productivity

By | August 28, 2013

We begin our investigation into this subject with the words of Matthews et al. (2005)1, who wrote that “coupled climate-carbon cycle model simulations have identified an important positive feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate, whereby future carbon uptake declines under anthropogenic climate warming.” Such is the conclusion of those who see a bleak future in store… Read More »

Medieval Warm Period in the Artic

By | August 28, 2013

This review begins with the study of Dahl-Jensen et al. (1998)1, who used temperature measurements from two Greenland Ice Sheet boreholes to reconstruct the temperature history of this portion of the earth over the past 50,000 years. Their data indicated that after the termination of the glacial period, temperatures steadily rose to a maximum of 2.5°C warmer than… Read More »

Historical Temperature Trends in China

By | August 28, 2013

Controversy abounds over the temperature history of the earth, particularly that of the past one to two millennia. The original debate was sparked by the papers of Mann et al. (1998, 1999), which challenged the long-accepted view that there was nothing unusual about earth’s climatic history subsequent to the inception of the Industrial Revolution; and it prompted the… Read More »

Cloud Cover and Climate Change

By | August 14, 2013

Understanding how clouds respond to anthropogenic-induced perturbations of our planet’s atmosphere is of paramount importance in determining the impact of the ongoing rise in the air’s CO2 content on global climate; for as Charlson et al. (2001) have noted, “man-made aerosols have a strong influence on cloud albedo, with a global mean forcing estimated to be of the… Read More »

How We Know They Are Lying

By | August 14, 2013

It is to some extent forgivable when people adopt extreme positions out of misapprehension or delusion. It is quite another matter if they mislead others by deliberate falsehood. Politicians, of course, treat the lie as part of their professional equipment. Indeed, in some circumstances they are obliged to use it (when, for example, telling the truth about the… Read More »